Teachers issue strike notice

The BC Teachers Federation has filed strike notice to take effect at 7:00 a.m. Tuesday, September 6th.

Phase 1 of job action means that teachers will not be performing administrative tasks such as filling out forms, collecting data, meeting with principals or other administrators, supervising on  playgrounds, or writing report cards.

“Teachers’ attention will be totally focused on the students in their classrooms, and not on the many bureaucratic and administrative tasks that take away from the joy of teaching and learning,” Susan Lambert, BCTF president says, adding that teachers will be in close communication with parents if the need arises.

Lambert called on Education Minister George Abbott and Premier Christy Clark to send their negotiators back to the bargaining table with a new mandate to achieve a negotiated settlement that will meet the needs of students and teachers alike.

source: BCTF website

Flames from grass fire seen for miles


Workers in Osoyoos took pictures of a large red ball of fire as grass burned fiercely on OIB land south of the old Haynes structures Wednesday afternoon after 2 o’clock.

Initially the Osoyoos Fire Department called in to contain the fire but were replaced by Ministry of Forestry crews who remained on the scene until all hot spots extinguished.

Earlier firemen were supported by an air bomber which dropped retardant on the smouldering area. No structural damage. No known injuries.  About five acres of grasslands burnt north of vineyards on the east side of Black Sage/(Radio Transmitter (Nk’Mip)/Rd 22 Junction. Check map at bottom of story.

 

Kits for kids – Telus program

More than 50 students in Oliver will receive a nice surprise in time for the new school year – a backpack filled with basic school supplies they likely would not have been able to afford otherwise. Earlier this summer, TELUS Community Ambassadors in the Okanagan gave 55 school bags filled with supplies to elementary, middle and secondary schools in the Oliver area, which will distribute them to students in need. Across Canada, nearly 9,500 students will receive a kit this fall, thanks to the TELUS “Kits for Kids” program.

 

This year, TELUS Community Ambassadors in the Okanagan rolled up their sleeves and prepared a total of 580 school bags for young students throughout the Okanagan, filling them with the necessary school supplies for each grade: pencils, glue sticks, notebooks, loose leaf paper, scissors, erasers, pencil cases, rulers, and much more. This initiative was part of the TELUS Day of Giving, an annual event during which TELUS team members and Ambassadors from across Canada donate their time and help local organizations.

 

“Going to school in September is a challenging time for many young people. They don’t need the added strain of not being able to afford the basic school supplies all their friends have, not to mention the impact that can have on their ability to learn and grow. They deserve the same chance as every other student, and we’re determined to provide it to them,” said Al Tiller, President of TELUS Community Ambassadors in the Okanagan. “TELUS’ Community Ambassadors are volunteers who are passionate about TELUS’ ‘we give where we live’ philosophy, and this work of equipping kids for school has been an integral part of the TELUS Community Ambassador tradition for many years.”

 

Every year, TELUS Ambassadors provide volunteer services at community events and support dozens of philanthropic programs and initiatives. In 2010, they distributed more than 8,000 school bags to kids in need and nearly 10,000 comfort kits containing personal hygiene items to the homeless.

Artist and teacher Robert Wood in town

Robert Wood has his paintings on display at Rustico Winery and is teaching his techniques at a special session for two days in Oliver.

A number of seats are left open by a cancellation so contact the Oliver Sagebrushers.

Here Wood holds one of his recent works at the Quail’s Nest Art Centre on 95th Street where classes continue Wednesday.

2010 flood victims wait and wait….

Victims of the 2010 Oliver slide who have yet to be
compensated for their losses and the politicians want to know why the bureaucracy is taking so long.

Dear Premier: In my recent telephone conversation with Ms.
Kathy Mercier, I learned that those who suffered from the June 2010 mudslide have not, as yet, been adequately compensated. I am forward her letter sent to me.

I discussed this issue with MLA John Slater, and also with
Director Allan Patton, of the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen (RDOS), who have both been working hard to resolve this issue. We came to the conclusion that, if the disaster had happened in the Greater Vancouver area, all victims would have been adequately compensated by now.

On behalf of the victims of the Oliver slide, I urge you to
act quickly to bring closure to this tragic event. Please rest assured that you have my full support as well as that of Director Patton and MLA Slater.

Alex Atamanenko MP  BC
Southern  Interior

***
Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen Oliver Area Director Allan Patton says many victims of the mudslide are still unable to go home.  Patton says he will be meeting with Environment
Minister Terry Lake at the Union of BC Municipalities convention in September to talk about compensation.  He says the province has hired a lawyer to negotiate with locals.   Patton says the province doesn’t want to sign off on any agreement until all affected residents have come to an agreement.  He says the RDOS is unable to issue building permits for residents who want to rebuild.

Sophie Johnston passes

Sophie (Miller) Johnston – (1918 – 2011) – It is with heavy hearts that we the family announce the passing of Sophie (Miller) Johnston, 93 years, of Oliver on the 28th day of August, 2011 at McKinney Place. Born in Etonia, Saskatchewan she was the daughter of the late Rudolf and Dorothy Miller. She is survived by sisters, Elsie, Dorothy & Edith; brothers, Rudy, Jackie;
sons, Ronald & William (Oliver) and Jim(Brenda), Oakfield, Nova Scotia; grandchildren, David (Michelle) Prospect, Nova Scotia; CarolAnn (Mike) Tesfaye,
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia; Teresa, Red Deer, Alberta; Crystal, Penticton, B.C; Melissa, Victoria, B.C. and Jonathan Shuman, Bedford, Nova Scotia; 6 great grandchildren, Rylee, Sophie and Quinn, Prospect, Nova, Scotia; Paige and
Kayl, Red Deer, Alberta and Shaelyn, Penticton.
Sophie was predeceased by husband of earlier years, Edgar; daughter, Patricia; sisters Katherina, Mary and brother Edward. She made many lifelong friends while working at Oliver Sawmill Box Factory and BC Fruit Growers Association. She supported many charities over the years with her famous apple pies and tarts. Sophie was a lifetime member and supporter of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. She especially enjoyed preparing meals and spending time with family and close friends. The Johnston family will
receive visitors at Graham Funeral Home, 34616 99 Street, Oliver on Wednesday,
August 31, 2011 between 7 and 9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church 9516 342nd Avenue, Oliver at 11:00 o’clock followed by a
reception in the church hall. Rev Darren Siegle will be officiating. Interment
will take place in the Oliver Cemetery. Family flowers only, by request.
Donations in memory may be made to St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 9516 342nd
Avenue, Oliver, B.C. or McKinney Place, R. 3 7139 362nd Avenue, Oliver, B.C.
Special thanks to all the caring and compassionate staff at McKinney Place
during Sophie’s stay. Arrangements entrusted to: Graham Funeral Home, 34616 – 99
Street, Oliver (250) 498-3833. Your messages of condolence sharing your fond
memories of Sophie may be sent to: www.grahamfh.com

Heritage Society chair responds

I don’t think it is appropriate for me to comment on the relative merits of the two staff members of the Oliver and District Heritage Society. It may, however, reassure Mr. McLennan to know that both staff members were served notice. The archivist position will also terminate but only after the board has an opportunity to determine the skill set that we will be seeking in a new managerial position. The archivist, Lynn Alaric, has agreed to support the board during this period of reassessment and will perform many of the functions Mr. McLennan says she has no interest in.

We have closed the museum building for the winter but we are not abandoning our museum role or our collection.  I ask that the public have some patience over the period of reassessment and that the board be judged on the new direction that emerges in the spring.

Michael Newman, Chair

Oliver and District Heritage Society

***

See letter of Mr. McLennan below

Letter to the Editor:

The closing of the Museum is outrageous. The reason for closure is: “Newman told the Chronicle the decision came down to the hard reality that the Society could not support two staff positions and have any money left for active programming and projects”.

I have been involved with the Heritage Society as President, Vice-President and effectively as Budget Director for several recent years. Based on this experience, I find Mr. Newman’s comments completely unbelievable.

Moreover, the Board could have chosen to fire its other employee instead since this individual does not have the same qualifications or management skills as Mr. MacKenzie – he holds a Masters Degree in Archival Sciences. This alternate choice would have been better from a management point of view since Mr. MacKenzie could direct the operations of both the Museum and Archives. The other employee has shown no interest in managing the Museum, keeping the accounting records, preparing budget details, taking minutes and seeking monies from the many sources available. The Board now puts itself in charge of all these detailed, tedious activities. How logical is that?

Mr. MacKenzie’s contribution to the Society is already very large. The most significant is the creation of a Heritage Register for the Town of Oliver and the Regional District. It was such a privilege to work with Mr. MacKenzie and others to see these and other projects realized.

The current Board had no mandate to close the Museum. They have broken faith with many Oliverites, both past and present, who worked hard to obtain tax support for the Museum, who contributed artifacts, time, energy, and money to have the Museum as an ACTIVE part of this community.

Mr. MacKenzie is a towering intellect. I am also “… taken aback that the Board didn’t speak to him about his goals or visions for the museum ….”. It is such a loss not to have Mr. MacKenzie’s vision for the Heritage Society enjoyed over time.

We have instead a much less illustrious vision being suggested by a Heritage Board which seems to lack the competence to manage its business and personnel and has lost touch with the past.

How utterly disappointing!!!

How sad I am to realize that the MacKenzie family may now move away.

Frank McLennan

 

 

Robert Wood to visit Quail's Roost

Born in Vancouver, Robert Wood vacationed in the South Okanagan as a boy and still returns to this “home away from home” when he can to paint in one of his favourite plein air locations.

Home is now Calgary, and Robert varies painting summer heat and light with painting Rocky Mountain snow and cold. Check out more of his work in two archives on his website here –

http://www.robertewood.ca/

Meet Robert on Sunday September 4 and take a look at what he’s painting next! Besides Robert’s demo, there’s an exhibit and sale. Linger and listen to live entertainment or enjoy some refreshments. It’s a great way to celebrate the long weekend!

Text supplied by Oliver Community Arts Council

Robert Wood to visit Quail’s Roost

Born in Vancouver, Robert Wood vacationed in the South Okanagan as a boy and still returns to this “home away from home” when he can to paint in one of his favourite plein air locations.

Home is now Calgary, and Robert varies painting summer heat and light with painting Rocky Mountain snow and cold. Check out more of his work in two archives on his website here –

http://www.robertewood.ca/

Meet Robert on Sunday September 4 and take a look at what he’s painting next! Besides Robert’s demo, there’s an exhibit and sale. Linger and listen to live entertainment or enjoy some refreshments. It’s a great way to celebrate the long weekend!

Text supplied by Oliver Community Arts Council

A visit to White Lake

The lake and the array.
For thousands of years, the universe has been studied by examining the light arriving at the earth from the stars, gas clouds and galaxies. In the past two decades, however, technology has given us the tools to capture and interpret other forms of electromagnetic radiation: radio waves, X-rays, infrared radiation and gamma rays. These all provide information on regions of the universe that are invisible to our eyes, and so increase our understanding.

The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory was established in 1959 to explore the universe using radio techniques. It is located at White Lake, a short distance from the Town of Oliver at a secluded site selected carefully to give the Observatory protection from the interfering effects of man-made radio signals.

Former Heritage Society president speaks out

Letter to the Editor:

The closing of the Museum is outrageous. The reason for closure is:  “Newman told the Chronicle the decision came down to the hard reality that the Society could not support two staff positions and have any money left for active programming and projects”.

I have been involved with the Heritage Society as President, Vice-President and effectively as Budget Director for several recent years.  Based on this experience, I find Mr. Newman’s comments completely unbelievable.

Moreover, the Board could have chosen to fire its other employee instead since this individual does not have the same qualifications or management skills as Mr. MacKenzie – he holds a Masters Degree in Archival Sciences.  This alternate choice would have been better from a management point of view since Mr. MacKenzie could direct the operations of both the Museum and Archives.  The other employee has shown no interest in managing the Museum, keeping the accounting records, preparing budget details, taking minutes and seeking monies from the many sources available.  The Board now puts itself in charge of all these detailed, tedious activities.  How logical is that?

Mr. MacKenzie’s contribution to the Society is already very large.  The most significant is the creation of a Heritage Register for the Town of Oliver and the Regional District.  It was such a privilege to work with Mr. MacKenzie and others to see these and other projects realized.

The current Board had no mandate to close the Museum.  They have broken faith with many Oliverites, both past and present, who worked hard to obtain tax support for the Museum, who contributed artifacts, time, energy, and money to have the Museum as an ACTIVE part of this community.

Mr. MacKenzie is a towering intellect.  I am also “… taken aback that the Board didn’t speak to him about his goals or visions for the museum ….”.  It is such a loss not to have Mr. MacKenzie’s vision for the Heritage Society enjoyed over time.

We have instead a much less illustrious vision being suggested by a Heritage Board which seems to lack the competence to manage its business and personnel and has lost touch with the past.

How utterly disappointing!!!

How sad I am to realize that the MacKenzie family may now move away.

Frank McLennan

 

 

Kitty needs a home

I am desperate to find her a place as my landlord didn’t take kindly the fact I had rescued this kitty girl, when we have agreed to no pets in the house.

She is just so pretty and unusually coloured I thought I would have no problem finding her a home quickly.

Now my landlord is coming to do repairs to the home and I have two days to find her a home before he gets here on Wednesday.

I have been advertising three weeks now and not a single inquiry (except her previous owner in Oliver who called me to tell they can’t or don’t want her back). Very frustrating!

The other reason is that she is an adolescent cat and I definitely didn’t want to leave her on the streets as pretty soon she will be able to get pregnant and the LAST THING we need is another litter of kittens when the SPCA is already bursting at the seams with cats and kittens waiting for adoption.

So if there is anyone out there who is compassionate, likes cats and is allowed to have her, PLEASE call Sheryl at 250-495-7870

Photo and story by Sheryl Parolin

3rd Annual Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Walk

For the past 10 years The Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Society (OAAS) has been providing HIV and AIDS education, prevention, and awareness information to the seven First Nations communities and to the three Friendship Centers located in the Okanagan Valley.  With continuing determination to prevent future HIV-related infections within the Okanagan Aboriginal community, OAAS is proud to announce the 3rd Annual Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Walk.

Right now, Aboriginal people living in British Columbia represent 5% of the Province’s total population but, shockingly, represent three times that number in prevalent HIV infections.  It is estimated that in BC, approximately one Aboriginal person tests positive for HIV every week.  Worse yet, almost 30% of newly diagnosed HIV infections are among Aboriginal youth.  In Canada, it costs an estimated $1.2 million to treat and care for one person living with HIV and AIDS over their lifetime.  Fortunately, HIV is 100% preventable with education and awareness.   All proceeds generated at this event will benefit the Aboriginal community to support local HIV prevention efforts; including an Okanagan Youth HIV Prevention & Awareness Campaign.

To ensure maximum participation, OAAS will continue to partner with the Okanagan Nation Alliance and will host the Walk in conjunction with the Okanagan Nation’s Salmon Feast Weekend located at the Okanagan Falls Provincial Park on September 17, 2011.  This event is open to the public and is particularly popular with the Aboriginal community, where approximately 500 people a day are expected to attend.

The 3rd Annual Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Walk will take place at Okanagan Falls Provincial Park on September 17, 2011 with registration beginning at 9 a.m. and the Walk beginning at 11 a.m.  Walkers will have a choice of completing a 1 km, 2 km, or 4 km walk, jog, or run for this worthwhile cause.
We will have prizes available for our “top fundraisers” in various categories.  In addition to the “top fundraiser” prizes, door prizes will also be distributed at the end of the walk.  Pledge forms are available on our website at www.oaas.ca or you may also pick up pledge forms at your local band office or health centre.
For those who wish to support the Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Walk, but cannot attend the Walk site on September 17, you may still contribute to the fundraising effort by downloading a pledge form at www.oaas.ca and sending along your pledge form and monies with another participant who will be walking with us in OK Falls Provincial Park on September 17, 2011.  For more information about the Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Walk, please call 1-778-754-5595 or log on to our website www.oaas.ca.

 

3rd Annual Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Walk

For the past 10 years The Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Society (OAAS) has been providing HIV and AIDS education, prevention, and awareness information to the seven First Nations communities and to the three Friendship Centers located in the Okanagan Valley.  With continuing determination to prevent future HIV-related infections within the Okanagan Aboriginal community, OAAS is proud to announce the 3rd Annual Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Walk.

Right now, Aboriginal people living in British Columbia represent 5% of the Province’s total population but, shockingly, represent three times that number in prevalent HIV infections.  It is estimated that in BC, approximately one Aboriginal person tests positive for HIV every week.  Worse yet, almost 30% of newly diagnosed HIV infections are among Aboriginal youth.  In Canada, it costs an estimated $1.2 million to treat and care for one person living with HIV and AIDS over their lifetime.  Fortunately, HIV is 100% preventable with education and awareness.   All proceeds generated at this event will benefit the Aboriginal community to support local HIV prevention efforts; including an Okanagan Youth HIV Prevention & Awareness Campaign.

To ensure maximum participation, OAAS will continue to partner with the Okanagan Nation Alliance and will host the Walk in conjunction with the Okanagan Nation’s Salmon Feast Weekend located at the Okanagan Falls Provincial Park on September 17, 2011.  This event is open to the public and is particularly popular with the Aboriginal community, where approximately 500 people a day are expected to attend.

The 3rd Annual Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Walk will take place at Okanagan Falls Provincial Park on September 17, 2011 with registration beginning at 9 a.m. and the Walk beginning at 11 a.m.  Walkers will have a choice of completing a 1 km, 2 km, or 4 km walk, jog, or run for this worthwhile cause.
We will have prizes available for our “top fundraisers” in various categories.  In addition to the “top fundraiser” prizes, door prizes will also be distributed at the end of the walk.  Pledge forms are available on our website at www.oaas.ca or you may also pick up pledge forms at your local band office or health centre.
For those who wish to support the Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Walk, but cannot attend the Walk site on September 17, you may still contribute to the fundraising effort by downloading a pledge form at www.oaas.ca and sending along your pledge form and monies with another participant who will be walking with us in OK Falls Provincial Park on September 17, 2011.  For more information about the Okanagan Aboriginal AIDS Walk, please call 1-778-754-5595 or log on to our website www.oaas.ca.

 

Alcohol use at firehalls to be debated Thursday

Next Thursday – RDOS directors will debate whether to institute a no-drinking alcohol policy at all fire halls it administers. This policy would govern seven fire volunteer fire departments.

The policy proposes that no alcohol would be stored in such fire halsl and consumption would only be allowed with a special occasion license.

Firehalls in Summerland, Princeton, Penticton, Oliver and Osoyoos are governed by separate policies of each municipality and would not be affected by a RDOS policy.

The Regional District management is telling its directors that a consistent policy is needed around the RDOS but says it fears that many volunteers may leave the fire service if there is no social component allowed.

The Regional District oversees seven volunteer fire departments: Anarchist Mountain, Kaleden, Keremeos, Naramata, Okanagan Falls, Tulameen and Willowbrook, which provide local fire protection to specific rural areas within Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E, G and H. In addition, Municipal and Regional departments also provide fire suppression to specific areas of Indian Band Lands under contract.

The District also contracts with the City of Penticton and the Town of Princeton to provide fire protection to the rural areas of Electoral Areas D-F (rural Penticton) and Electoral Area H (rural Princeton).

911 fire calls for the Okanagan-Similkameen are relayed to a secondary dispatch centre at the No.1 Penticton Fire Hall. At that location Regional Fire Dispatchers handle a multitude of calls from fires, to motor vehicle accidents to medical first response.

Responses:

5 Responses to RDOS – Fire Hall/alcohol use policy

  1. Karenh says:

    August 29, 2011 at 8:30 am (Edit)

    I think if you volunteer as a fireman you could be able to have a say in their rules, protocol  and culture in the halls. Butt out  RDOS.

  2. Olivier Combret says:

    August 29, 2011 at 7:25 am (Edit)

    Next thing you know, the police will set road blocks to make firemen blow! how ridiculous is that!
    There is a real disconnect between the people who work hard and the regulators. Not to paraphrase a famous song but…. Hey! RDOS! leave our firemen alone!

  3. Norma says:

    August 28, 2011 at 8:03 pm (Edit)

    My husband was a Volunteer Fire Chief in Surrey for twenty years where most of there halls were run
    by volunteers and never had any problems with them having beer in the halls.These men and women are responsible dedicated to what they do for such little pay . a couple made a mistake and they have more than paid for it now. so move on and let them do what they do best .You could volunteer yourself for the job ?

  4. Paul Tribbick says:

    August 28, 2011 at 1:37 pm (Edit)

    Here we go again, people making rules for no good reason. Do we have an epidemic of drunk firemen leaving fire practice no! Do we have fire trucks piled up from drunken fire men driving them no! Do we have any evidence that there is a problem with this no! What possible differance can a permit make to the consumtion of alcahol in any one building. Of coarse these people will cite liability, well if you people would stop making stupid laws the lawyers would have less to liable about. You are talking about firemen who are responsible adults and you trust with millions of $ worth of equiptment, why do you think you can’t trust them to drink responsible. The Oliver fire dept has had it’s issue with this. They  are stll being punished for something that a few firemen did, and an over reaction of our local elected leaders. It does have an effect on moral. It is getting harder all the time to get people to voluteer, and make no mistake about it, it is a volunteer organization. Keep in mind the averege payed firefighter gets in excess of $80,000 per year the average volunteer fire fighter gets $3,000. Please respect your volunteer fire dept.

  5. Don says:

    August 28, 2011 at 7:56 am (Edit)

    Once again an example of a Regional District government putting in needless regulations apparently just to assert themselves. This sort of nonsense happens all over the province with this unnecessary level of government which was foisted on us back in the days of Dave Barrett.

Rudbeckia

by Penelope Johnson

The species are commonly called coneflowers and black-eyed-susans; all are native to North America and many species are cultivated in gardens for their showy yellow or gold flower heads.